Tag Archives: HULF 2020

photo of Debbie Young with the two boxes and a HULF banner

2020 HULF is a Festival in a Box!

Photo of book boxes

HULF in a Box – now in full swing on Debbie Young’s front wall at Post Cottage, France Lane, Hawkesbury Upton

HULF Founder & Director Debbie Young writes:

Although we had no choice but to cancel the 2020 Hawkesbury Upton Literature Festival its usual format due to coronavirus lockdown, we’ve come up with an alternative to at least mark the day and share great books by our Festival authors with anyone passing by as they take their permitted daily exercise.

Welcome to HULF in a Box!

What exactly is a Festival in a Box?

To mark our official Festival Day, I’ve filled both the Lttle Free Library boxes on my front wall exclusively with books by HULF authors.

Photo of interior of adult book box

Something for all tastes in the Festival Box for adults

photo of interior of childrens box

The Festival box for young readers includes books for all ages – plus the anthology for adults from our first ever HULF

What’s in the boxes?

In our Festival in a Box you’ll find something to suit all tastes.

For adults there are contemporary, historical and speculative fiction, poetry, and self-help, including books by AA Abbott, Ali Bacon, Lucienne Boyce, William Fairney, Clare Flynn, Mari Howard, David Penny, Michael Macmahon, Alison Morton, Stephen Oram, Alice Rosewell, T E Shepherd, Joyce Williams and Shirley Wright – and me, Debbie Young.

For young readers, there are picture books by Hawkesbury artist Caroline Mockford,  and chapter books for children by Hawkesbury author Betty Salthouse, and some gripping reads for young adults, including exciting novels by HULF Young Readers’ Director Kate Frost, HULF regular Trevor Stubbs, with his amazing FLIP! series, and two novels by teenage Gloucestershire novelist Alexandra Killworth.

I’ve also added  the few remaining copies of the anthology from the first HULF in 2015, which includes a sample from books by every author who took part.

Special thanks to those Festival authors who have kindly sent copies of their books specifically for this use. 

As books are borrowed, I’ll be filling the gaps with my personal copies of other Festival authors’ books.

I now declare the first ever HULF in a Box – and the sixth Hawkesbury Upton Literature Festival – officially open!

Photo of Debbie Young with book boxes and banner

I even dressed the part to launch HULF in a Box, donning my book-themed earrings (a gift from Heidi Perry, who has helped so much with HULF each year), my book-print skirt, and my trusty HULF Author badge!

Now Help Yourselves!

As always with the LIttle Free Library, anyone may borrow them and to return them when they’ve finished – but I always say that if someone loves a book so much that they want to keep it, or to pass it on to a friend , they’re welcome to do that.

HULF usually lasts just one (very action-packed!) day – but HULF in a Box will remain open for as as long as I have enough Festival authors’ books available to fill it.

Who said we couldn’t have a sixth HULF this year? I think my HULF in a Box still counts!

Here’s to the 7th Hawkesbury Upton Literature Festival on 24th April 2021 – and let’s hope we have the same glorious weather that we’re enjoying for the sixth!

Note: As with any item you collect from people’s front walls at the moment – and there’s a lot of it going on in Hawkesbury! – you’re advised to take sensible precautions, including wiping down the book cover when you get it home and washing your hands thoroughly. You may also choose to leave the book to one side for a day or two before you start reading it. All the books  in the HULF in a Box are new or in as-new condition. 

Background Information about the Little Free Library

For years I’ve hosted on my front garden wall a Little Free Library, inspired by the movement in the US to share books and encourage reading for pleasure in the local community. My father made the first box for me, and before long I was getting so many books donated that I had to ask my husband Gordon to make a second one. Now we have one box for young readers, (clear-fronted) and one for adults (with an opaque front). Earlier this year, Gordon gave both boxes a spring makeover – just in time for our HULF in a box!

Like to launch a Little Free Library of your own to share your love of reading during lockdown? Visit www.littlefreelibrary.org for inspiration!

 

HULF Author Barry Faulkner in “The Times” Diary

Barry Faulkner’s cutting from The Times newspaper, Tuesday 6th August 2019

HULF author Barry Faulkner made the national press earlier this month – and he didn’t even know about it until another Festival regular, David Penny, pointed it out to him.

The reason? It was an anonymous entry in The Times’ diary section, sharing one of the many anecdotes that feature in Barry’s talks. Barry is a popular guest speaker for WIs and other social groups, and he presumes that, unknown to him, one of the diary’s columnists or informants must have been in the audience at one of his talks.

Barry’s popular DCIS Palmer police procedurals are inspired by his own background – not as a policeman, but as a member of a London family actively involved in petty crime. To make it easier to read than the photo, here’s a transcript of the topical anecdote shared in The Times:

LAG TAKES A DIG AT POLICE

As the ground grows ever harder, a gardening tip comes from the criminal underworld. The writer Barry Faulkner’s family were petty criminals and, after a local theft, his father knew CID were watching. For five nights he took a shoebox to his ill-kept allotment, stayed for half and hour, then departed. On the sixth night the fuzz swoopd in, dug the place up and found nothing. On the seventh day Faulkner’s father went back, finally able to plant his potatoes.

Barry, pictured on the far left below speaking on a panel at this year’s CrimeFest, the leading international crimewriting convention, will be sharing more insights and anecdotes like this at HULF 2020, when he will be giving a talk about celebrated London criminals and his family’s own involvement.

 

In case you’re wondering, Barry’s own past is blameless. Instead of following in the family tradition, he went into advertising, before breaking into writing and editing comedy scripts for major television series. No wonder his novels are so entertaining!

In the meantime, if you’d like to read more about the “Diamond Geezers” featured in Barry’s talks, visit his blog here: www.geezers2016.wordpress.com/.

And if you’d like to read his novels, you’ll find them on Amazon, available in paperback and ebook. All of his books are also available via Kindle Unlimited, so if you’re a subscriber, you can download all his books as part of your monthly subscription plan.